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C of I Greek chapters shine a light on philanthropy

April 20, 2015 5:00 pm Published by

C of I Greek chapters shine a light on philanthropy | College of Idaho Savala Smith, C of I director of student involvement, credits the Greeks as the largest group of students dedicated to philanthropy events throughout the school year.

“Each Greek organization has a national philanthropy that they sponsor,” Smith said. And Greek-led projects and fundraisers help ensure that service to the local community remains in the hearts and minds of all C of I students.

If you would like to get involved with Greek life or philanthropy events, be sure to check out “Greek Week,” happening April 20-24 on campus.
To view and/or apply for current job openings, click here.

Tree cutting begins for first phase of 20-year Chelsea Botanical Gardens in Norwich

April 20, 2015 5:00 pm Published by

The Day – Tree cutting begins for first phase of the Chelsea Botanical Gardens project in Norwich – News from southeastern Connecticut Tree cutting begins for first phase of the Chelsea Botanical Gardens project in Norwich

Norwich After nearly 23 years in the planning and fundraising stages, the first tree cutting has started at the proposed 80-acre Chelsea Botanical Gardens in Mohegan Park, and planners hope to obtain major grants to open the first phase of the project by 2017.

Hugh Schnip, acting president of Chelsea Gardens Foundation, gave the City Council an update on the project Monday after the first signs of construction raised questions about the project by neighbors and city officials.

Schnip said all environmental and planning permits have been in place for several years, and the organization has progressed slowly, using funding to date to do environmental testing and architectural drawings. The master plan for the project was redesigned twice, and the current plan calls for minimal clear cutting in the land leased from the city.

The project would be located along Wilderness Drive and Judd Road behind the Norwich Rose Garden. On the western boundary would be a 50-foot buffer zone behind houses on Butternut Drive, Schnip said, and most of the buildings would be at least 500 feet from neighboring homes.

Schnip said the work going on now includes six acres of tree clearing to create the main access road from Wilderness Drive, a parking area for 61 cars, and an area where the first buildings will be constructed including a year-round butterfly garden, administration building, gift shop, and a garden school building to be leased to a British organization as its “U.S. Two high-quality vernal pools are in this area, to be called “the Fens,” and Chelsea Gardens Foundation plans to erect educational signs to explain how wetlands work, Schnip said.

The group mostly will use walking trails that already traverse the property to create the 8-foot wide walking trails, he said.

The tree cutting is costing only $5,000, as the contractor will retain the wood, Schnip said, but the overall first phase is expected to cost $20 million. Schnip said it was crucial for the foundation to show some progress in its attempt to secure major grant and foundation funding.

If a major grant is secured, the group would embark on a local capital campaign fund drive to raise any required matching shares.

Future phases in the southern and eastern portion of the property take up to 20 years to complete as funding allows, Schnip said.

Schnip said project planners have estimated that the project could attract 100,000 to 150,000 visitors per year to Norwich.

“I think we’ve got a good plan,” he told the council.

Philanthropic Gift Advisor I

April 20, 2015 5:00 pm Published by

Job ID 5411 Type Regular Full-Time Company Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Location US – WA – Seattle Overview

At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center , home to three Nobel laureates, interdisciplinary teams of world-renowned scientists seek new and innovative ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. An independent, nonprofit research institute based in Seattle, Fred Hutch houses the nation’s first and largest cancer prevention research program, as well as the clinical coordinating center of the Women’s Health Initiative and the international headquarters of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network.

The Philanthropic Gifts Advisor serves on the Development team and reports to the Director, Philanthropic Gifts. The Philanthropic Gifts Advisor will manage a personal portfolio of individuals and family foundations and will be called upon to engage and collaborate with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) leadership staff, faculty and volunteers as required. The Philanthropic Gifts Advisor must be able to effectively communicate the mission, values and scope of the institution. Partner with the Philanthropic Gifts team to develop and implement strategies for gifts of $50,000 and above

Jefferson Awards honor those who give back

April 20, 2015 5:00 pm Published by

Jefferson Awards honor those who give backJefferson Awards honor those who give back

Co-Chair and presenter, Tatiana Copeland, speaks at the Jefferson Awards Foundationas Salute to Service in Delaware event Monday at the Gold Ballroom in the Hotel DuPont.(Photo: SUCHAT PEDERSON/THE NEWS JOURNAL)

Sussex Central High School student Samantha Franklin experienced more adversity by the time she was a teenager than most do in a lifetime.

But that has not stopped her from giving back to her community.

“I learned early in life that [it] is all about choices,” she told a crowd Monday at the Hotel du Pont, where she was honored with a Jefferson Award for Public Service. In addition, Delmarva Power donated 1,200 smoke alarms to fire officials to raise fire safety awareness.

Mike Castle congratulates Braeden Mannering, 11, of Bear for receiving the “Outstanding Youth Service in the Jefferson Awards LEAD360 Challenge. (Photo: SUCHAT PEDERSON/THE NEWS JOURNAL)Monica Prestowitz receives the “Outstanding Service by an Employee in the Workplace” as the Jefferson Awards Foudation celebrate community volunteerism at their third annual “Salute to Service in Delaware” at the Gold Ballroom at the Hotel DuPont. (Photo: SUCHAT PEDERSON/THE NEWS JOURNAL)Samantha Franklin receives the “Outstanding Service Benefitting Local Communities” as the Jefferson Awards Foudation celebrate community volunteerism at their third annual “Salute to Service in Delaware” at the Gold Ballroom at the Hotel DuPont.

Community Foundation of Grand Forks accepting grant applications

April 20, 2015 5:00 pm Published by

The Community Foundation of Grand Forks, East Grand Forks & Region is accepting applications for its 2015 grant cycle, according to a news release.

The grants will be awarded to nonprofits with applications focusing on addressing area issues, seizing opportunities and improving quality of life.

The Community Foundation – Women’s Fund also is accepting applications, which will be awarded to nonprofits whose applications “provide ideas, energy and resources” that empower local girls and women to achieve economic, social and political equality, the release said.

Both grant applications are due June 1, 2015.

Bringing the best

April 20, 2015 5:00 pm Published by

at Glenwood Middle School.
Hess, a former associate of Columbus, Indiana’s Chamber of Commerce, said that with its similar experience with corporate growth, Columbus has much it can teach Findlay.
“Columbus, Indiana and Findlay are sister cities, in terms of population, size, demographic makeup and fairly large corporate citizens,” Hess said.
Like Findlay, which benefits from the presence of major companies like Marathon Petroleum Corp., Cooper Tire & Rubber Co., Whirlpool Corp. and McLane Co., which is building a new distribution center, Columbus is also home to numerous large companies, most notably Cummins, Inc., a Fortune 500 engine manufacturer.
These companies “have a strong need for global talent, especially in engineering and business services,” Hess said.
Because of the similarities between Findlay and Columbus, economic development officials in both cities have had a long relationship. Tony Iriti, director of Findlay-Hancock County Economic Development, said the issue of whether or not Findlay is ready to welcome new corporate employees has been a topic among several community organizations for at least a couple of years.
Wednesday’s forum is being sponsored by the Hancock Leadership Alumni Association, the Hancock County Community Foundation“>Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation, the Findlay-Hancock County Alliance, Findlay City Schools, the University of Findlay and the Findlay Publishing Co., which publishes The Courier.
Iriti said that research shows that the newest generation of the workforce tend to pick the community first and then the employer, so, if Hancock County is to attract the best employees, it needs to have the amenities they are looking for.
“We need to be able to attract the best and the brightest employees for our companies,” Iriti said. “And if we can’t retain them, we’ll be on a slippery slope.”
In addition to young professionals, a diverse community that can attract employees and students from other countries will also be important.
“Over the last 25 years we’ve done a pretty decent job welcoming the Japanese to Findlay and Hancock County,” Iriti said. You can attract them, but you have to engage them,” he said.
Knowing of Hess’ expertise in the area of community building, sponsors of Wednesday’s forum asked Hess to come to Findlay to begin dialogue on the topic here.
Hess said that in 2004, Columbus did a community-wide survey through its community foundation.
The survey provided a “benchmark” measurement on how the city welcomed new people. Is it easy for newcomers to get involved in community activities?
“We found out that maybe we weren’t as welcoming as we thought we should be,” Hess said.
From this, Columbus put forth several initiatives. The center employs “navigators” who help newcomers integrate into the community and offers classes in English as a second language.
A new organization was also started with representatives of several different ethnic groups which now offers cross-cultural activities and programs.
Hess said it was important to think of not only the employees the businesses might attract, but the families they would bring with them.
Columbus conducted a follow-up survey in 2011, which Hess said showed that significant improvements had been made but there is still work to do.
Hess said Wednesday’s forum will allow Hancock County leaders to establish a local benchmark.
Hess will be joined in Findlay by John Burnett, president and CEO of Columbus’ Community Education Coalition.
Hess said the evening will be divided into two parts. Hess said the Columbus community learned that other communities that had been successful in opening up to new people had a defined strategy for attracting, developing and engaging them.
Secondly, Burnett will lead a discussion on what particular steps this community can take to become a more welcoming community.
Angela Crist, a member of the Hancock Leadership Alumni Association, said Wednesday’s forum is “a conversation that really needs to happen.”
“We see all these great growth opportunities for the community,” Crist said. Listening to them, and taking into consideration their experiences from other places they’ve lived, can only make this community stronger, she said.
Iriti and Crist said the organizations sponsoring Wednesday’s forum were discussing the issue of a welcoming community for a couple of years, long before recent controversies such as a local debate about putting an addiction recovery house in a residential neighborhood and a proposed religious freedom bill in Indiana that opponents said made it legal to discriminate against certain groups of people.
But the concept of a welcoming community can apply to any number of subgroups, not just prospective employees.

Walmart Foundation opens application period for nonprofits

April 20, 2015 5:00 pm Published by

Walmart Foundation opens application period for nonprofits – starherald.com: Business

; Walmart Foundation opens application period for nonprofits

MINNEAPOLIS a The Walmart Foundation State Giving Council Program opened the application period for its second cycle of giving this week.

Walmart Foundation seeking Oklahoma nonprofits for program

April 20, 2015 5:00 pm Published by

Walmart Foundation seeking Oklahoma nonprofits for programWalmart Foundation seeking Oklahoma nonprofits for programApplications are being accepted from Oklahoma nonprofit organizations for The Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Council Program.More >>Applications are being accepted from Oklahoma nonprofit organizations for The Walmart Foundation’s State Giving Council Program.More >>HUD awards nearly $360K to help Oklahoma homeless veteransHUD awards nearly $360K to help Oklahoma homeless veteransThe U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Department of Veterans Affairs have awarded nearly $365,000 in Oklahoma to help homeless military veterans find permanent homes.More >>Reserve deputy who shot, killed suspect is due in courtReserve deputy who shot, killed suspect is due in courtA 73-year-old Tulsa County volunteer deputy who shot and killed a suspect after mistaking his handgun for a stun gun is expected in court.More >>A 73-year-old Tulsa County volunteer deputy who shot and killed a suspect after mistaking his handgun for a stun gun is expected in court.More >>Sports Minute: Here is the latest Oklahoma sports news from The Associated PressSports Minute: Here is the latest Oklahoma sports news from The Associated PressThe University of Oklahoma’s Kolbey Carpenter has been named the Big 12 baseball Player of the Week. Carpenter is an infielder and outfielder and was chosen after hitting .421 with a home run, two doubles, three RBIs…More >>News Minute: Here is the latest Oklahoma news from The Associated PressNews Minute: Here is the latest Oklahoma news from The Associated PressGov. Voters approved a bond issue in 2014 to pay for the expansion .More >>Officer: Bullet Shot Through my Front DoorOfficer: Bullet Shot Through my Front DoorAn officer who’s home was a recent target of gunfire said he’s thankful his family wasn’t hurt.More >>An officer who’s home was a recent target of gunfire said he’s thankful his family wasn’t hurt.More >>Community Reacts to Sheriff’s AddressCommunity Reacts to Sheriff’s AddressSheriff Stanley Glanz says he is not stepping down, despite public calls for his resignation. More >>Volunteer Effort Going SlowlyVolunteer Effort Going SlowlyAn effort is underway to honor the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing.It calls on all Oklahomans to perform acts of service, kindness and honor.But so far there doesn’t appear to be a lot of activity in the Tulsa area.On Monday morning we contacted the United Way and 14 other major non-profit organizations.They haven’t had much volunteer work that’s tied to the bombing anniversary.But it’s not too late.There are plenty of opportunities available for those who’d like to take part.On…More >>An effort is underway to honor the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing.It calls on all Oklahomans to perform acts of service, kindness and honor.But so far there doesn’t appear to be a lot of activity in the Tulsa area.On Monday morning we contacted the United Way and 14 other major non-profit organizations.They haven’t had much volunteer work that’s tied to the bombing anniversary.But it’s not too late.There are plenty of opportunities available for those who’d like to take part.On…More >>



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